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Table 3 Knowledge about Rift Valley fever occurrence in pastoral settlements of North-central Nigeria

From: Seropositivity and associated intrinsic and extrinsic factors for Rift Valley fever virus occurrence in pastoral herds of Nigeria: a cross sectional survey

Variable Pastoralists No
n (%)
Yes
n (%)
X2 P-value
Sign of RVF in cattle
 High fever Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
145 (72.1)
125 (61,9)
56 (27.9)
77 (38.1)
4.80 0.020
 Anorexia Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
72 (35.8)
13 (6.4)
129 (64.2)
189 (93.6)
52.87 < 0.001
 High mortality in newborn calves Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
65 (32.3)
15 (7.4)
136 (67.7)
187 (92.6)
39.3 < 0.001
 Sudden onset of abortions Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
30 (14.8)
11 (5.4)
171 (85.1)
191 (94.6)
9.8 0.001
 Mucopurulent nasal discharge Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
138 (68.7)
86 (42.6)
63 (41.3)
116 (57.4)
27.76 0.001
 Listlessness in newborn calves Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
113 (56.2)
35 (17.3)
88 (43.8)
167 (82.7)
65.58 < 0.001
 Profuse fetid diarrhea Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
163 (81.1)
117 (57.8)
38 (18.9)
85 (42.1)
25.51 0.001
Mode of transmission of RVF in cattle
 Bites of infected mosquitoes Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
85 (42.3)
56 (27.7)
116 (57.7)
146 (72.3)
9.40 0.002
 Bites of other biting flies Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
149 (74.1)
121 (59.9)
52 (25.9)
81 (40.1)
9.23 0.002
 Contacts with aborted foetus Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
156 (77.6)
119 (58.9)
45 (22.4)
83 (41.1)
16.26 0.001
Zoonotic nature of RVF
 RVF can be transmitted from animals to humans Agro-pastoralist
Nomadic
152 (75.6)
179 (88.6)
49 (24.4)
23 (11.4)
11.59 0.001
  1. X2 – Chi-square; Statistically significant at p < 0.05