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Table 2 Description of 12 studies evaluating control strategies of CWD in wild deer in North America

From: Systematic review of management strategies to control chronic wasting disease in wild deer populations in North America

Author and year of publication Study location Data collection period Target population Sex or age-specific analyses Study design Intervention Outcome evaluated Conclusions
Predictive modeling studies
Gross and Miller, 2001, J Wildl Manage [20] Colorado NA Mule deer Sex (m/f)- and age-specific Stochastic and agent-based predictive model Selective culling and varying transmission rates (method undefined) Change in CWD prevalence
Change in wild deer population size
Cost not evaluated
Control measures effective in some scenarios
Wasserberg et al., 2009, J Appl Ecol [21] Wisconsin NA White-tailed deer Sex (m/f)- and age-specific Multi-state non-spatial deterministic predictive matrix model Recreational harvest and additional population reduction for disease management Change in CWD prevalence
Change in wild deer population size
Cost not evaluated
Control measures effective in some scenarios
Wild et al., 2011, J Wildl Dis [22] National Park Service, Coloradoa NA Not specified, wild deer No Deterministic predictive modeling using differential equations Role of large predators [wolves] in disease control Change in CWD prevalence
Change in wild deer population size
Cost not evaluated
Control measures effective in some scenarios
Potapov et al., 2012, Proc R Soc B [23] University of Alberta, Albertaa NA White-tailed deer Age-specific (adults only) Deterministic, stock-and-flow predictive modeling Increased overall hunting pressure with and without combination of vaccination Change in CWD prevalence
Change in wild deer population size
Cost not evaluated
Control measures effective in some scenarios
Jennelle et al., 2014, PLOS One [24] Wisconsin NA White-tailed deer Sex (m/f)- and age-specific Deterministic, compartmental predictive modeling Increased overall hunting pressure; increased hunting pressure on targeted sex group Change in CWD prevalence
Extent of geographic spread of CWD
Change in wild deer population size
Cost not evaluated
Control measures effective in some scenarios
Oraby et al., 2014, J Theor Biol [25] University of Ottawa, Ontarioa NA Not specified, wild deer No Deterministic, stock-and-flow predictive modeling Seasonal hunting Change in CWD prevalence
Change in wild deer population size
Cost not evaluated
Control measures effective in some scenarios
Analytical observational studies
Conner et al., 2007, Ecol Appl [26] Colorado 1996 – 2005 Mule deer Sex (m)- and age-specific Analytical; observational, before-and-after control impact (BACI) Planned culling (focal culling in hot spots using sharpshooters) Change in CWD prevalence
Cost not evaluated
Control measure not effective
Mateus-Pinilla et al., 2013, Prev Vet Med [27] Illinois 2003 – 2008 White-tailed deer Sex (m/f)- and age-specific Analytical; observational; cohort Planned culling (government-organized, localized culling, population control permits and nuisance deer removal permits using sharpshooters) Change in CWD prevalence
Cost not evaluated
Control measure effective
Manjerovic et al., 2014, Prev Vet Med [28] Wisconsin; Illinois 2003 – 2012 White-tailed deer No Analytical; observational, cross-sectional Planned culling (government-organized, localized culling using sharpshooters) Change in CWD prevalence Cost not evaluated but acknowledged as a need Control measure effective
Analytical experimental studiesb
Wolfe et al., 2012 [29] Colorado; Research Facility 2003 Mule deer ~15 months at beginning of trial Analytical; experimental trial; controlled Oral administration of pentosane polysulfate; tannic acid; tetracycline HCl for prevention of CWD infection Change in CWD status of individual deer Control measure not effective
Pilon et al., 2013 [30] Colorado; Research Facility 2007 – 2009 Mule deer No Analytical; experimental trial; controlled Intramuscular vaccination with two different prion peptide sequences Change in CWD status of individual deer Control measure not effective
Goñi et al., 2015, Vaccine [31] Colorado; Research Facility Not reported White-tailed deer No Analytical; experimental trial; controlled Mucosal immunization with attenuated Salmonella vaccine expressing PrP Change in CWD status of individual deer and length of incubation period Efficacy of control measure not clear
  1. aLocation of modeling team. Location of population under study was not specified
  2. bThese studies were excluded from further review